Chris Boros

Program Director

Chris Boros is WMRA’s Program Director and local host from 10am-4pm Monday-Friday.

He’s been working in public radio for more than 20 years from his first job as a student employee at WKSU to hosting All Things Considered in New Mexico.  Originally from NE Ohio, Chris has worked at five public radio stations and had a short stint in commercial rock radio.  He’s been a production and operations director, music host and programmer, reporter, behind the scenes producer, technical director, and he studied radio/tv production at Kent State University.  His biggest accomplishment is when he created cassette tapes at 7, pretending to be a radio DJ, counting down his favorite songs.  His first official radio gig was as Entertainment Reporter for a High School show at 14.  It’s all about radio and audio for Chris.  In his free time, Chris hangs out with his wife, Genesis, and their two dogs and cats.  He plays guitar, writes songs for fun, and records demos for nobody to hear.  Chris digs b-movies and likes pondering mysteries.  His main passion is music with Celtic, folk, and progressive rock at the top of his list.  Alice Cooper is one of his heroes and he has a secret love affair with the Mellotron.

Ways to Connect

WMRA will be adding some new programs to our schedule starting Saturday, August 15.

ASC

Many organizations have had to get creative during these times to continue to serve the community, including American Shakespeare Center in Staunton. 

Free Clinic

As hospitals and doctor’s offices work on managing COVID-19, the Harrisonburg - Rockingham Free Clinic has also had to make some changes to adapt to the pandemic. 

Pat Jarrett / VA Folklife

During the COVID-19 pandemic, artists and performers have been losing work and many have taken their craft online.  The VA Folklife Program recognized this and started the TRAIN program, which pairs master artists with students online. 

Universal History Archive / Universal Images Group

The flu pandemic of 1918 lasted from January of that year till about December of 1920, and it infected roughly 500 million people.  But what was life like during that time?  And how did the federal government respond? 

With closed doors and cancellations, many organizations are taking creative steps to continue to serve the community. 

Jayberries via Wiki / Creative Commons

Anxiety and depression are running high these days over concerns of COVID-19.  Charlottesville resident and author Lisa Jakub has written about her own struggles with anxiety and panic attacks.  She recently spoke with WMRA's Chris Boros about some techniques that can calm a racing heart.

ZeWrestler via Wiki / Creative Commons

Augusta County has declared a state of emergency in response to the threat to public health and safety from the Coronavirus.  The declaration allows the County to make decisions quickly concerning emergency actions.  Tim Fitzgerald is the Augusta County Administrator.

The Johnson Collection / Public Domain

When indigenous people living in the valley and Central Virginia first encountered Europeans they had already established communities with social and political standards with rich cultural traditions. Award-winning historian and professor of History at Virginia Commonwealth University, Gregory Smithers, will discuss the history of Native Southerners at WMRA's Books & Brews March 10 and 11, 2020.

WMRA Daily 2/20/20

Feb 20, 2020

New School Grants have been announced at promoting computer science education.  Faith leaders from across Virginia are pressing Senate Democrats to abandon their approach to raising the minimum wage.  More incentives could be coming for Virginia developers looking to build apartment complexes that include low and very low-income tenants in their plans.

Lally Laksbergs via Flickr / Creative Commons

Paul Bugas is an expert on Virginia fresh water fishes.  He covers how to collect, handle, observe, conserve, and protect these unique animals in a new Field Guide to Freshwater Fishes of Virginia.  He’s our speaker for WMRA’s Books & Brews January 14-15.  Paul recently sat down with WMRA’s Chris Boros who asked him how he started his career researching fish.

Every April, downtown Harrisonburg is home to a DIY music festival called MacRock which supports independent artists and musicians.  It began over twenty years ago as an extension of JMU’s college radio station WXJM.  It’s now independently run by a small group of dedicated music lovers like Grant Penrod who’s been involved with the festival for years.  The application deadline to apply

The tale of Ebenezer Scrooge is timeless with over two dozen film adaptations of Charles Dickens' classic. George C. Scott and Henry Winkler have both starred in the title role.  But for many, the 1970 musical version called Scrooge with Albert Finney stands out from the rest. 

WMRA Holiday Schedule

Saturday, Dec. 21:

12pm     Acoustic Café Holiday Special

WMRA’s Tina Owens will spin holiday favorites from the acoustic folk music world.  Join us to hear your favorite holiday music done acoustically.

3pm       All Songs Considered for the Holidays    

This year's ASC for the Holidays will be NEW and not a repeat as previously announced. 

4pm       The Big Tiny Desk Holiday Special

tortugadatacorp via Pixabay / Creative Commons

According to author and musician Gayla M. Mills, music brings people together, it enhances the humdrum of daily living and playing it can benefit your life in many ways.  Gayla is the featured author for December's Books & Brews.  She recently spoke with WMRA’s Chris Boros who asked her to describe when music entered her life.

WMRA and James Madison University present The John Grisham Writers Hour with special guest Jon Meacham, an award-winning historian and biographer who writes about the history of division in the United States in his book The Soul of America.  Both writers sat down together on the campus of JMU in September 2019.

Charlottesville resident Lisa Jakub worked as a young actor and starred in major Hollywood movies.  But she gave it all up after an eighteen-year career partly due to anxiety and depression.  In her latest book, Lisa embraces her weird to find answers in dealing with mental health. 

Jenny Burden

The Smith House Galleries in Harrisonburg, with the Support of Arts Council of the Valley, emphasizes its connection to the community with a space that highlights art from Harrisonburg and Rockingham County.

TedXCharlottesville

Dr. Gail Christopher is an award winning social change agent and former Senior Advisor and Vice President of the W. K. Kellogg Foundation. 

Kid Pan Alley / https://www.kidpanalley.org/

Virginia’s Kid Pan Alley is on a mission to empower children to create their own music.  The group works with children to give kids an opportunity to work together to write their own song – both music and lyrics.

Qimono / Pixabay

With conspiracies and Devil’s advocates dominating the scientific field, many are left to ask what scientific discoveries hold truth. As science increasingly becomes disputed, Dr. James Zimring, professor of pathology at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, explores in his new book how much people should trust what they read, learn, and observe in our natural world.

Eric T. Gunther via Wiki / Creative Commons

On April 16, 2007, 32 people were shot and killed at Virginia Tech.  Journalist Thomas Kapsidelis supervised the Richmond Times-Dispatch’s coverage of the tragedy.  In his new book, Kapsidelis examines the decade after the massacre through the experiences of survivors and those who lost loved ones. 

Sari Carp / Sustainability Matters

The Shenandoah Valley is home to vast trees, plants, and wildlife that contribute to the growing Virginia environment. Sari Carp is the Executive Director for the non-profit Sustainability Matters, which works to take initiatives for the environment.

Andrea Turner via Pexels / Creative Commons

Listening to music on vinyl records has made a huge comeback over the years.  Once thought to be a dead format, vinyl is now responsible for a large portion of music sales throughout the world. 

Historian Jon Meacham says the United States’ current political division is nothing new.  In his new book, The Soul of America, Meacham examines times when the country was just as divided. 

Taber Andrew Bain / Creative Commons

Last year, James Madison University adopted the Green Dot violence prevention strategy, an interactive program focused on building skills to prevent violence and sexual assault on campus. 

Veteran Charlottesville songwriter, Ellis Paul, was on the road during the Unite the Right rally two years ago which erupted in deadly violence.  Coming back home to a city in mourning prompted him to pen “The Battle of Charlottesville” as a historical document of the incident.  WMRA’s Chris Boros spoke with Ellis Paul who described why this song was something he had to write.

Fifty years ago, Harrisonburg resident Ed Morrison was shattered when his 18-year-old brother Mike was brutally murdered the night of his senior prom, along with his date Debbie Means, in a small Illinois town.

This weekend (July 12-14) is the Red Wing Roots Music Festival, celebrating roots music with artists like Lucinda Williams, The Wood Brothers, and Tim O’Brien.  The festival is organized by Virginia’s The Steel Wheels - they headline the event every year.

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