The $1 Trillion Bipartisan Infrastructure Bill Is In. Next Up: Amendments And Votes

Updated August 2, 2021 at 10:49 AM ET The Senate is poised to begin voting on a roughly $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure package this week following a rare weekend session, culminating days and weeks of wrenching negotiations among a group of bipartisan lawmakers and President Biden. The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, which totals 2,702 pages , is part of what Democrats say is a two-track system to pass a bipartisan measure while also taking up a more ambitious spending bill...

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Coronavirus Live Updates

U.S. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona has a message for schools across the country ahead of the new school year: Students need to be in classrooms.

"That's where students learn best," Cardona told NPR's A Martínez. "Schools are more than just places where students learn how to read and write — they're communities. They're like second families to our students."

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Mask up, America. Now, that could have been a catchy slogan. Instead, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offered confusing guidance this past week. Vaccinated Americans in some parts of the country should mask up indoors again.

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Kansas Rocks The Valley

Jul 29, 2021

American progressive rock giants Kansas are celebrating their 47th anniversary with a concert Saturday night (July 31, 2021) as part of the Shenandoah Valley Music Festival in Orkney Springs.

As part of WMRA’s partnership with StoryCorps in the Shenandoah Valley and Central Virginia, we’re sharing a conversation today between Dolly Frazier and her friend Marla. Marla and Dolly attended the same high school but never really knew each other. In 2009, Dolly lost her son Austin, who suffered from bipolar disorder. After reading his obituary, Marla wrote a letter that started a deep and lasting friendship.

Over the next three Saturdays, venues in Staunton, Fishersville, and Waynesboro are hosting 'Vax the Valley' events put on by the Central Shenandoah Health District and Augusta Health. WMRA's Randi B. Hagi reports.

As part of WMRA’s partnership with StoryCorps in the Shenandoah Valley and Central Virginia, we’re sharing a conversation today between René White from the Lumbee Nation and Chris White, who traces his ancestry back to Cherokee, co-founders of the Native American Church of Virginia.

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Former WMRA reporter, producer and host Martha Woodroof died at her home near Harrisonburg early Sunday morning, as stated on her facebook page in a post by her daughter. Woodroof was 74 and had been diagnosed with cancer.

Former WMRA reporter and host Martha Woodroof died at home near Harrisonburg early Sunday morning, according to a post by her daughter on her Facebook page.

Randi B. Hagi

The Little Free Libraries, those book-sharing boxes that have popped up all over the world in the last decade, have inspired another open-access method of sharing media: miniature outdoor art museums, such as the one now on display outside The Fralin Museum of Art in Charlottesville. WMRA's Randi B. Hagi reports.

As part of WMRA’s partnership with StoryCorps in the Shenandoah Valley and Central Virginia, we’re sharing a conversation today between Mark and Cynthia Lorenzoni who own the Ragged Mountain Running and Walking Shop in Charlottesville. 

Randi B. Hagi

If you live in the Shenandoah Valley and you enjoy fresh veggies, there’s a good chance that the tomatoes, green onions or squash on your plate came through the Shenandoah Valley Produce Auction.  WMRA's Randi B. Hagi reports.

StoryCorps

As part of WMRA’s partnership with StoryCorps in the Shenandoah Valley and Central Virginia, we’re sharing a conversation today between environmental writer and advocate Chris Bolgiano and her friend, Janet Wright.

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Team USA's baseball squad lost a nail-biter to host nation Japan in extra innings on Monday, leaving the Americans with no room for error as they hope to play their way into the gold medal final.

Facing the tournament's only other undefeated team, the U.S. had been poised for a pivotal win after grabbing a 6-3 lead. But Japan fought its way back and then forced extra innings, after tying the score 6-6 in the bottom of the ninth.

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly talks with Nicole Auerbach, senior writer for The Athletic, about the realignment of athletic conferences and what this means for the future of college football.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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A podcast about songs created by The Steel Wheels and commissioned by fans during the 2020 Pandemic. This podcast is a creative collaboration with WMRA.