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Here & Now
Weekdays at 1pm

A live production of NPR and WBUR, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day — with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation.
The show's daily lineup includes interviews with newsmakers, NPR reporters and contributors, plus innovators, authors and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

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  • After the first presidential debate, newspaper editorial boards across the U.S. called for Biden to end his campaign. The Philadelphia Inquirer instead called on Trump to leave the race. And, a number of Supreme Court decisions significantly weakened the authority of federal agencies. Slate's Mark Joseph Stern explains the far-reaching effects of these rulings. Then, what makes the ideal potato chip? WBUR staffers tried a variety and voted on their favorite ones. Here & Now's resident chef Kathy Gunst breaks down the top picks.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • A new investigation from ProPublica and CBS News found that contractors for crisis pregnancy centers are wasting millions of dollars of taxpayer money. ProPublica's Cassandra Jaramillo joins us. And, Republican state Sen. Katrina Shealy and Democrat state Sen. Margie Bright Matthews bonded over abortion rights despite party differences. They join us to discuss. Then, Dara Torres is among the most decorated female Olympians in American history. She discusses her long Olympic career and looks ahead to the Paris Games.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • NATO Deputy Secretary General Mircea Geoană joins us to discuss the alliance's 75th anniversary and its support for Ukraine. And, the Gaza Health Ministry says an Israeli airstrike killed more than 25 people in southern Gaza as ceasefire talks are expected to resume. NPR correspondent Aya Batrawy joins us. Then, musician Arlo Guthrie turns 77 on Wednesday. We share a recent conversation we had with him about his life, work and legacy.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • The United Nations Security Council meets Tuesday to discuss Russia's deadly missile strike on a children's hospital in Kyiv. Financial Times correspondent Christopher Miller joins us from Ukraine. And, following the first presidential debate, media coverage has largely focused on President Biden's age and competency. NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik explores whether it has been fair. Then, with some states now requiring bible instruction in public schools, Tim Alberta — staff writer at The Atlantic — talks about the rise of Christian nationalism in the U.S.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • President Biden sent congressional Democrats a letter Monday reiterating he is in the 2024 presidential race to the end. NPR's Ximena Bustillo joins us for the latest. And, Colorado Secretary of State Jena Griswold has been receiving threats since the beginning of her state's lawsuit to remove former President Donald Trump from its ballot. She talks about threats to election workers and other secretaries of state. Then, a left-wing coalition won the most seats in this weekend's parliamentary elections in France, but there's still the prospect of a hung parliament. The Sunday Times' Peter Conradi joins us for more on the election and what's to come. Plus, Traci Thomas of "The Stacks" podcast joins us with some audiobook recommendations perfect for this summer.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • Lord Maynard Llera of the restaurant Kuya Lord has been crowned this year's James Beard Award winner for Best Chef in California. He joins us to talk about the achievement. And, Here & Now's resident chef Kathy Gunst shares recipes to help you spruce up classic summer salads. Then, in his new cookbook "Mad Love," chef Devan Rajkumar shares dishes that merge his roots in Guyana, South America and the Caribbean.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • Author Boyce Upholt's new book "The Great River" tells the story of the river, the Indigenous people who lived alongside the Mississippi and the white settlers who came along to claim it. Then, Here & Now's Scott Tong takes a trip to a Delaware Beach to see horseshoe crabs mating. The undignified process takes on a new resonance amid considerable concern about a decline in population, as the crabs are harvested for their blood and as bait. And, Minneapolis music writer Andrea Swensson talks about her book commemorating the 40th anniversary of Prince's "Purple Rain" album, which regularly ranks as one of the greatest albums of all time.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • Following the U.S. Supreme Court ruling on presidential immunity, history professor Ruth Ben-Ghiat joins us to break down how that decision could lead to authoritarianism. And, air conditioning can be a matter of life and death. But some people in the U.S. are turning it off to limit their environmental impact. Here & Now's Peter O'Dowd reports. Then, breaking, known to many as breakdancing, will make its Olympic debut in Paris. Longtime b-boy and breaking competition judge Donnie "Crumbs" Counts joins us.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • The Caribbean nation of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines is assessing the devastating aftermath of Hurricane Beryl. Ernesto Cooke of the St. Vincent Times shares a first-hand account of the storm. Then, President Biden is forcefully criticizing the Supreme Court's ruling that gives former presidents broad immunity from prosecution for official acts. Andrew Desiderio of Punchbowl News tells us more. And, how might that decision alter the balance of power in the U.S.? Former U.S. Attorney Barbara McQuade weighs in. Plus, Elaine Lee Turner and her sisters were called "the most arrested family in the Civil Rights movement." She joins us to reflect on the 60th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • As the Supreme Court's term comes to an end, law professors Kim Wehle and Louis Virelli join us to break down the recent court decisions. And, professor Caroline Le Pennec explains her research that shows presidential debates have little effect on voters' decisions. Then, New York City is planning to announce a ban on cell phones in the city's public schools. Chalkbeat New York's Amy Zimmer joins us.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • The Supreme Court issued several major decisions Friday on homelessness, government agency power and the Jan. 6 attack. The New York Times Magazine's Emily Bazelon and Slate's Mark Joseph Stern tell us more. Then, we discuss the political fallout from the first 2024 presidential debate between President Joe Biden and former President Donald Trump. We're joined by NPR's Ron Elving, USA Today's Francesca Chambers and Chad Pergram of Fox News. And, Here & Now's James Perkins Mastromarino discusses June's gaming news, including the hotly anticipated add-on to Elden Ring.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy
  • The Supreme Court released a decision temporarily allowing abortions for medical emergencies in Idaho. The Court also blocked a multibillion-dollar settlement with Purdue Pharma and put an EPA smog rule on hold. Rewire News Group's Imani Gandy, Columbia Law School's Camille Pannu and NPR's Brian Mann join us. And, Here & Now's Chris Bentley and Peter O'Dowd spent a night staying in an Earthship in Taos, New Mexico. They unpack the stay and the other forms of sustainable living they learned about.Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoicesNPR Privacy Policy