Racial Justice

Latest News and Updates on the Struggle Against Racism in America

A NASCAR team debuted a new "Blue Lives Matter" paint scheme on its Chevy Camaro over the weekend at the Homestead-Miami Speedway.

Xfinity Series driver Kyle Weatherman and his racing team said it was a show of solidarity with law enforcement officers and first responders to thank them for their "service, sacrifice and dedication."

The Los Angeles Times' top editor is scrambling to placate journalists of color after years of often-unfulfilled promises by the paper to make grand progress in the diversity of the newsroom's ranks.

Some journalists have used terms such as "internal uprising" to describe their anger over racial inequity at the paper. Scores have participated in intense internal debates over the LA Times' coverage of recent protests and hiring practices, to the point that senior editors have weighed in, promising to listen and learn.

After almost three weeks of demonstrations following the death of George Floyd while in Minneapolis police custody, America seems to be at a threshold moment.

Polling shows attitudes shifting more in favor of protesters and embracing the potential for change when it comes to how policing is done in this country.

Police departments in at least half a dozen states have already moved to make reforms, but when it comes to sweeping national change, it's not clear how far Washington will go.

A growing number of residents and officials in Los Angeles County are demanding answers in the death of a black man whose body was discovered hanging from a tree in a park.

Robert Fuller's body was found early Wednesday in Poncitlán Square in Palmdale, Calif., a commuter city roughly an hour north of Los Angeles. The 24-year-old's death was deemed a likely suicide based on preliminary findings, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department said.

Weeks of nationwide protests over police abuse prompted the National Football League earlier this month to condemn racism and shift its stance against players protesting racial injustice.

Updated at 10:08 p.m. ET

For the third weekend in a row, protesters took to the streets in the United States — and in at least two foreign capitals — to demand racial justice in the wake of George Floyd's killing by police.

As demonstrators gathered around the White House last weekend, Howard University law student Tope Aladetimi leaned her cardboard protest sign against the street median and took a load off her feet. She had already been out protesting for a few hours, and the temperature was climbing into the 90s.

"There's a power in using your body, and actually physically being here," Aladetimi said. "Oftentimes, our voices aren't heard and this is the only way we're able to get our message across."

Domonique Dille, a Howard law school classmate, feels an urgency to this moment.

City councils and state legislatures around the country are considering dramatic changes to policing, but a big obstacle to police reform is often police officers themselves and the unions that represent them.

That's especially true in Minneapolis, where many residents are calling for the controversial head of the police union there to resign while some officers appear to be breaking ranks.

Updated at 9:44 p.m. ET Sunday

As Atlanta protesters took to the streets again Sunday, incensed by the killing of Rayshard Brooks, a 27-year-old black man fatally shot by a police officer, body cam videos released by the Atlanta Police Department showed Brooks being polite and for the most part, calmly complying with officers' requests.

As police unions across the nation face growing demands from the public to change the way officers interact with civilians, and particularly people of color, the head of the Memphis, Tenn., police union says he agrees with the need for reform — in some cases.

The civil rights movement largely passed East Texas by in the 1950s and '60s. Today, more than a half century later, there remains little tradition of protest in the region — part of plantation country during slavery — and scant experience with organizing.

Why are there U.S. military bases named for Confederate officers who took up arms against the United States?

I've covered stories at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, where the XVIII Airborne Corps is headquartered, and Fort Benning, Georgia, known as the Home of the Infantry.

In 2020, things happen that never happened before. And right now, they seem to be happening all at once.

Atop a global pandemic and resulting recession, May and June have given us another dimension of head-spinning events. Following two weeks of widespread street protests after George Floyd was killed by police in Minneapolis, a change of attitude seems to have swept through the national culture like a sudden wind.

The killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police last month sparked outrage that has spilled into the streets, with mass demonstrations and marches against police brutality and systemic racism.

Black photographers have been documenting the nationwide protests in a way that amounts to telling "our own history in real time," said Brooklyn, N.Y.-based commercial photographer Mark Clennon, "because our parents, and grandparents never really had a chance to have their voices heard."

Confederate monuments in the former capital of the Confederacy are being transformed into a new kind of icon as activists alter and pose for photos at the statues, one of which is at the center of a legal fight over its planned removal.

The police killings of George Floyd, Eric Garner and other black men and women began with allegations of a minor offense, such as passing a counterfeit $20 bill or selling individual, untaxed cigarettes.

Mayor Marty Walsh on Friday declared racism a public health crisis in Boston. To tackle the emergency, Walsh said he will reallocate $3 million of the department's overtime budget to public health. Walsh said the decision comes after he listened to Black people — both in the Black Lives Matter movement and in his life — who shared with him "how racism shapes lives and hurts communities."

Bubba Wallace has yet to win a race in NASCAR's premier Cup series, but he's been thrust into the spotlight as the lone African American driver in a sport steeped in white Southern heritage.

A Kentucky state commission voted on Friday to remove a statue of Jefferson Davis from the state Capitol's main rotunda.

The statue of the former Confederate president, who was born in Kentucky, has stood in the rotunda for 84 years. The 11-1 vote by the state's Historic Properties Advisory Commission was requested last week by Gov. Andy Beshear, who said the statue should be moved elsewhere.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has signed what he says are the most aggressive police accountability measures in the nation, including criminalizing the use of chokeholds, following weeks of protests over the death of George Floyd at the hands of the Minneapolis police.

French police say they are being stigmatized during protests in France against police violence in the wake of George Floyd's death.

On Thursday, police gathered in front of precincts across the country and threw down their handcuffs in a symbolic gesture against what they say is unfair criticism.

Is the NFL newly woke?

Many say for a league that's been criticized for lagging behind on issues of race, it seems that way.

Friday, Commissioner Roger Goodell announced the NFL will observe June 19th as a recognized holiday. The day, referred to as Juneteenth, commemorates the effective end of slavery in the U.S. Goodell made the announcement in a memo to league offices in New York City, New Jersey and Los Angeles.

Dear NFL Colleagues:

President Trump said Friday that "generally speaking," he thinks police should avoid using chokeholds, but he stopped short of saying he supports a ban on the tactic, explaining that he felt it would leave police officers without a measure they might need in certain one-on-one situations.

"I don't like chokeholds," Trump said an interview that aired on Fox News. "Sometimes, if you're alone and you're fighting someone, it's tough," he said.

"It would be, I think, a very good thing that, generally speaking, it should be ended."

Three major chains have announced plans to stop locking up beauty and hair care products aimed at black women and other customers "from diverse backgrounds." The companies — Walmart, Walgreens and CVS — made their plans known in separate statements shared with NPR on Friday.

A prominent statue of Winston Churchill in London has been covered up over fears it could be vandalized, as it and other monuments in the U.K. have become a rallying point for anti-racism demonstrators.

Authorities fully encased the statue of Britain's wartime leader in the city's Parliament Square less than a week after it was defaced during a protest against the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

"Say their names," the signs read in the streets of America. In 2020, one reckoning shares an unstable boundary with another as protesters masked against the coronavirus expose a different kind of deep debilitation: the racism that permeates American history and the present day, resulting in sudden deaths now recorded and shared on social media, but always present within history, from the arrival of enslaved Africans on the Virginia Coast in 1619 onward.

More than 90% of U.S. churches were closed at the height of the coronavirus pandemic.

Former Defense Secretary and CIA chief Robert Gates said Thursday that it was "misguided" and "a bad mistake" to push away peaceful protesters at St. John's Church in Washington, D.C., where they had congregated on June 1 after the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police officers.

The area was cleared with chemical irritants before President Trump took a photo with the Bible in front of the church.

Mourners will have an opportunity Friday to pay their respects to David McAtee, a black man who was shot to death earlier this month when officers with the Louisville Metro Police Department and Kentucky National Guard troops converged on a crowd.

In late April, more than 200 black women who are leaders and activists within the Democratic party signed an open letter to the presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden calling on him to select a black woman as his running mate.

"It is a fact that the road to the White House is powered by Black women and Black women are the key to a Democratic victory in 2020," they wrote.

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