Brian Naylor

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk. In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent, and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress, and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Journalism Award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

President Trump, bowing to political reality, says he is putting off his thoughts of finding a replacement for the Affordable Care Act until after the 2020 election.

In remarks to reporters Tuesday, Trump said, "I wanted to put it after the election because we don't have the House." But it became clear that he didn't have support for a replacement to Obamacare in the GOP-led Senate, either.

Updated at 1:40 p.m. ET

The assertion by Attorney General William Barr that special counsel Robert Mueller found the Trump campaign did not conspire with the Russian government in 2016 removes, for now, a major focus of Democrats' messaging.

But it has also given them an opening to turn to an issue they believe is more important to many voters anyway: health care.

With the completion of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference into the 2016 presidential election, attention now shifts to Attorney General William Barr, the man who will determine how much of that report to make public — along with what information will be provided to Congress.

Amid signs that special counsel Robert Mueller will soon complete his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, President Trump says that he looks forward to seeing the report and that it should be made public.

Answering questions from reporters on the South Lawn of the White House prior to traveling to Ohio on Wednesday, Trump said of Mueller's report, "Let it come out. Let people see it — that's up to the attorney general."

Updated at 6:15 p.m. ET

The White House says President Trump will nominate Stephen Dickson, a former executive and pilot at Delta Air Lines, to lead the Federal Aviation Administration.

For years, the big tech companies have been given pretty much a free rein by Capitol Hill to act as they chose. What congressional oversight of the industry, there was largely focused on whether there was political bias on various platforms.

But in an abrupt reversal this week, Congress is holding oversight hearings, and lawmakers are proposing new regulations in a crackdown on how big tech companies use and resell their customers' personal information.

White House communications director Bill Shine is resigning his position, the Trump administration announced Friday.

Shine, a former Fox News executive, will become a senior adviser to President Trump's 2020 re-election campaign, according to a White House statement.

"Bill Shine has done an outstanding job working for me and the Administration," Trump said in the statement. "We will miss him in the White House, but look forward to working together on the 2020 Presidential Campaign, where he will be totally involved. Thank you to Bill and his wonderful family!"

Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, announced Thursday that he will not be running for president in 2020.

Brown, who recently conducted a multistate "dignity of work" tour, announced that he decided "the best way for him to continue his fight for workers is by serving Ohio in the U.S. Senate."

Brown was re-elected to the Senate last fall and has been one of the few Democrats to win a statewide race in Ohio in recent years, raising hopes among some in the party that he could carry his home state against President Trump.

Sen. Martha McSally, R-Ariz., said Wednesday that while in the Air Force, she was raped by a superior officer.

The dramatic revelation came as she testified before a Senate Armed Services subcommittee hearing on sexual assault in the military.

"I was preyed upon and raped by a superior officer," McSally told the hearing in her opening statement.

She testified that she blamed herself, adding, "I was ashamed and confused." She said she did not report her assault, saying, "I didn't trust the system at the time."

The House oversight committee is demanding the White House turn over documents and witness interviews that it had previously requested as it probes the security clearance process at the White House.

This comes after the New York Times and Washington Post reported that President Trump ordered a top secret clearance for son-in-law and adviser Jared Kushner, despite the concerns of intelligence officials and then-White House chief of staff John Kelly.

North Carolina prosecutors have announced that Leslie McCrae Dowless, the political operative accused of illegally collecting absentee ballots in that state's 9th Congressional District, has been indicted on charges of obstruction of justice and possessing absentee ballots.

President Trump is nominating Kelly Knight Craft as the new U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. If confirmed by the Senate, Craft, currently U.S. ambassador to Canada, will succeed Nikki Haley, who announced her departure last fall.

Former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld said Friday he is thinking about challenging President Trump for the 2020 Republican presidential nomination.

Weld, a moderate Republican, was twice elected governor. He supports abortion rights and was an early proponent of gay rights.

He resigned his post as governor after being offered the ambassadorship to Mexico, but the nomination stalled in the Senate after opposition from other Republicans.

Weld then ran as the Libertarian Party's vice presidential nominee in 2016 on a ticket with former New Mexico Gov. Gary Johnson.

Brock Long, who led the Federal Emergency Management Agency during 220 declared disasters since 2017, announced his resignation Wednesday.

Updated at 5:03 p.m. ET

As the clock ticks toward a Friday deadline to avert another partial government shutdown, a new stumbling block has emerged in talks between congressional Democrats and the White House: Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention beds.

Hundreds of thousands of federal workers received their first partial paychecks this week as the government reopened Monday after a 35-day partial shutdown.

Some 400,000 workers had been furloughed, and another 400,000 had been on the job but were not getting paid.

While the financial costs for those workers were high, the shutdown also took a heavy toll on employee morale. And it may have the longer-term impact of making it more difficult to bring new people into the government.

Updated at 9 p.m. ET

After an at-times heated debate, the Senate on Thursday, as expected, failed to approve either of the competing measures that would have ended the standoff over border wall funding.

If nothing else, the votes seemed to spur a flurry of efforts to find a way to end the standoff. Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., announced on the Senate floor after the measures failed that he spoke with President Trump about a three-week stopgap bill to reopen the government.

Updated at 4:35 p.m. ET

Former Sen. Harris Wofford, a lifelong civil rights advocate and backer of progressive causes, died Monday at a Washington hospital at age 92.

Wofford died after suffering a fall, his son told The Washington Post.

Updated at 6:20 p.m. ET

The back and forth between President Trump and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., over the partial government shutdown escalated Friday, as Pelosi said the White House leaked plans for a congressional delegation to fly commercially to Afghanistan.

On Thursday, Trump said he was revoking a military flight for the codel, suggesting Pelosi fly commercial instead.

Updated at 3:20 p.m. ET

The annual State of the Union message to Congress may be the latest casualty of the partial government shutdown.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., sent a letter to President Trump on Wednesday, suggesting a postponement until after the shutdown is over. The speech, which the president would deliver to a joint session of Congress and a national broadcast audience, was originally scheduled for Jan. 29.

Updated at 5:20 p.m. ET

President Trump says he is willing to declare a national emergency if Democrats don't go along with his demands for $5.7 billion for a border wall.

Trump's campaign for a border wall took him to McAllen, Texas, on Thursday for a visit to a Border Patrol station and a roundtable discussion with local officials, before heading to the Rio Grande.

One of the agencies affected by the partial government shutdown — now in its third week — is the Internal Revenue Service. While many taxpayers may not feel this is a great loss, they'll still have to pay their taxes — and the shutdown has created a good deal of uncertainty for everyone planning to file their tax returns in the coming months.

But fear not, the White House says; tax refund checks will be sent out, even though the IRS, part of the Treasury Department, is for the most part closed.

Updated at 7:27 p.m. ET

A closed-door briefing for congressional leaders in the White House Situation Room on Wednesday failed to resolve any issues between Democrats and the Trump administration over funding for border security.

The stalemate has led to a partial government shutdown, now nearing the two-week mark.

"I don't think any particular progress was made," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., told reporters afterward.

Updated 4:59 p.m. ET

Picking a fight with the leader of his party the day before being sworn in, former GOP presidential candidate and incoming freshman Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, writes that President Trump "has not risen to the mantle of the office."

Updated at 8:32 p.m. ET

A partial government shutdown beginning at 12:01 a.m. ET Saturday looks certain after both the House and Senate adjourned until noon on Saturday without an agreement on spending acceptable to President Trump that would also pass in the Senate.

Updated at 10:48 p.m. ET

The House passed a short-term funding bill Thursday night that includes the money for additional border security President Trump wants — but the measure is unlikely to pass the Senate, raising the likelihood of a partial government shutdown that would begin Friday night at midnight.

Updated at 10:15 p.m. ET

The threat of a partial government shutdown this weekend may be diminishing.

The Senate passed a short-term measure Wednesday night to keep the federal government open into 2019. The House is expected to take up the bill on Thursday. Funding currently expires at midnight on Friday.

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Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET

New York Attorney General Barbara Underwood has announced that the Trump Foundation will dissolve. The foundation was established by Donald Trump well before he ran for president.

Updated Dec. 18 at 5:28 p.m. ET

Planning a trip to the Grand Canyon over the coming holidays?

You might want to have a Plan B ... or at least bring your own trail maps.

While the Grand Canyon, along with the rest of the national park system, is expected to remain open in the case of a government shutdown, visitor centers at the facilities probably won't. And some iconic sites, including the Statue of Liberty, may be closed altogether if the park service follows past practices.

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