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What lies ahead for Ukraine

Women look at houses damaged by shelling in Chernihiv, Ukraine, Thursday, April 7, 2022. Ukraine is telling residents of its industrial heartland to leave while they still can after Russian forces withdrew from the shattered outskirts of Kyiv to regroup for an offensive in the country's east. (Evgeniy Maloletka/AP)
Women look at houses damaged by shelling in Chernihiv, Ukraine, Thursday, April 7, 2022. Ukraine is telling residents of its industrial heartland to leave while they still can after Russian forces withdrew from the shattered outskirts of Kyiv to regroup for an offensive in the country's east. (Evgeniy Maloletka/AP)

It’s Independence Day in Ukraine.

Official celebrations have been canceled. But the fact that there’s an independent Ukraine at all is celebration enough for Ukrainians.

And President Zelenskyy is vowing to fight on.

“The blue and yellow flag will wave again at home where it has a right to be,” the president said. “In all temporarily occupied cities and villages of Ukraine in those temporarily occupied, it will wave forever.”

Today, On Point: six months since Russia invaded, is there a path to victory for Ukraine?

Guests

Tanya Kozyreva, a Ukrainian investigative journalist and Pulitzer Prize finalist now starting a one-year Neiman Fellowship at Harvard University.

Michael Kofman, director of Russia studies at CNA, a military research and analysis organization. (@KofmanMichael)

Olga Ivshina, correspondent for the BBC Russian Service.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.