WMRA News

WMRA Daily 2/20/18

Feb 20, 2018

Hearings continue over the taking of land for the Atlantic Coast Pipeline… In the wake of the mass school shooting in Florida, police investigate social media threats to public schools in Harrisonburg and Augusta County… And, the second annual “Memories Matter” fair in Charlottesville revives some very personal African-American histories….

Marguerite Gallorini

In an effort to preserve local African-American history, Monticello and the Jefferson School’s African American Heritage Center, and more than a dozen other partners, organized the second annual community history fair in Charlottesville called “Memories Matter.”  WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini has the story.

Jordy Yager

Charlottesville officials are attempting to craft a strategy to fight an affordable housing crisis. On Friday, the city hosted its first-ever housing summit, bringing together dozens of stakeholders for a day-long attempt to find common ground. WMRA’s Jordy Yager has this report.

WMRA Daily 2/19/18

Feb 19, 2018

Both houses in the General Assembly released their proposed budgets Sunday, and the House budget includes two things the Senate’s version does not – a pay increase for teachers, and funding for Medicaid expansion… meanwhile, in Charlottesville, leaders wrestle with the worsening affordable housing shortage….

WMRA Daily 2/16/18

Feb 16, 2018

Only one of the many gun control bills proposed in the General Assembly has survived… but some form of Medicaid expansion looks more likely… and, we profile a Woodstock World War II vet who is still flying, and saving lives….

Courtesy of John Billings

At the ripe young age of 94, World War II pilot John Billings is still flying, and with a copilot friend, transporting medical patients to treatments. WMRA’s Christopher Clymer Kurtz reports.

WMRA Daily 2/15/18

Feb 15, 2018

Two state Senate bills target the traffic problem on I-81, and just make it under the Crossover Day deadline… a fifth Republican throws his hat into the ring to challenge Senator Tim Kaine this November… and, current and former employees at the Cargill plant in Dayton allege abuse by the company….

David Kreider via Facebook

Local activists and union organizers have filed a charge against Cargill in Dayton for retaliating against employees because of their union activities. They say that Cargill is not living up to its own code of conduct. WMRA’s Christopher Clymer Kurtz reports.

2016 photo by Christopher Clymer Kurtz

This week advocates for alternative transportation fuels gathered in Washington, D.C. to network and meet with Congressional staff and other officials. Harrisonburg’s Alleyn Harned was there and spoke with WMRA’s Christopher Clymer Kurtz.

WMRA Daily 2/14/18

Feb 14, 2018

Virginia state legislators pass Crossover Day with some big issues, including Medicaid expansion and oversight of electric monopolies, remaining unresolved… other bills are passed addressing sanctuary cities and suspensions of grade-school children…. Meanwhile, city officials in Charlottesville deal with too many deer….

Courtesy of the Miller Center

Chris Christie, the former New Jersey Governor and Republican presidential candidate, visited the Miller Center Monday to discuss his bid for the Republican nomination, and what he thinks of the first year of the Trump presidency. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini has this report.

WMRA Daily 2/13/18

Feb 13, 2018

The company behind the Atlantic Coast Pipeline is suing a property owners association in Nelson County over land for the pipeline… a new law may save you money on your electric bill after all… and, former New Jersey governor and Trump supporter Chris Christie visits the Miller Center in Charlottesville….

Courtesy League of Women Voters of the Charlottesville Area

After the events in Charlottesville last August, many citizens wanted to be informed on how local government works, and how it might be structured differently in the future. The local League of Women Voters and Charlottesville Tomorrow teamed up to provide an educational discussion on the matter, divided in two events this month. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini attended the first one yesterday afternoon.

WMRA Daily 2/12/18

Feb 12, 2018

Charlottesville residents learn how their local government works, and its limits… the state Supreme Court denies an elderly Staunton man’s appeal of his first-degree murder conviction… and, why are some rural residents stringing up coyote carcasses?

Some big businesses want bigger trucks on Virginia roads.  A compromise is on the table for changing what counts as a felony.  Lawmakers debate whether police can learn the immigration status of a witness.  A political donor tries to entice candidates to take his money instead of Dominion’s, and advocates push the limits of medical marijuana in Virginia.

Lawmakers move to protect student information, limit some suspensions, and ensure children won’t be shamed in the lunch line.  Also, coal ash ponds stay open for now, and community-wide conversations on racism begin in Charlottesville.

Courtesy of Point Made Films

A month-long community conversation about racism is going to take place in Charlottesville. And it starts Friday, February 9, with the screening of the documentary, I’m Not Racist… Am I?. The screening is happening, with the filmmakers present, at the Paramount Theater in Charlottesville. Some local schools, universities and libraries are also hosting the film, followed by public conversations about racism with the help of trained facilitators. WMRA’s Marguerite Gallorini has this report.

The fiscal effect of making Medicaid recipients work for their coverage.  Adjusting prosecutor’s options for dealing with underage sexting.  New limits on drones.  A gerrymandering solution.  Confronting a troubled past and honoring pioneers at UVa.

While consensus grows on lifting a utilities rate freeze, lawmakers and activists differ on the details. Middle and high school students would learn about boundaries and privacy under a new bill.  The governor and house speaker team up to reduce regulations.  NPR’s TV critic Eric Deggans talks about how media divides us.

Assembly members take on the opioid epidemic.  Paid Family leave struggles in Richmond.  Lawmakers debate whether court fees should keep you from driving but leave women’s advocates hanging.  Kessler’s attackers are sentenced.  Dominion estimates the cost of upgrades.

Lawmakers in Richmond negotiate terms for expanding Medicaid while one legislator proposes an alternative.  The Mountain Valley Pipe Line is put on hold over compensating landowners.  Virginia signs on to a letter protesting offshore drilling.  Charlottesville finally begins forming its first Citizens Police Review Board.

In February the city of Charlottesville will begin considering applicants for its first ever Police Civilian Review Board. The board has been a long time coming, and has been mired in politics. WMRA’s Jordy Yager has more.

Lawmakers in Richmond consider Internet restrictions.  Dozens of environmental bills meet their end in the Assembly, while a gun rights bill stays alive…for now.  Confederate Monuments win protection and sexual harassment training for legislators gets hung up.

Christopher Clymer Kurtz

Dairy farmers are facing hard times due to a flooded milk market and low prices. At the same time, many hungry families lack quality protein in their diets. Now some congregations in Harrisonburg are hoping to help alleviate both problems with one ministry: cheese. WMRA’s Christopher Clymer Kurtz reports.

WMRA Daily 1/31/18

Jan 31, 2018

Poultry workers in Dayton protest Cargill’s labor practices… A coalition of conservation groups has gone to court to challenge federal regulators' decision to approve the proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline … and, a bill to expand Medicaid advances in the General Assembly, but it contains work requirements that Democrats oppose….

Jordy Yager

On Monday afternoon, former White House photographer Pete Souza spoke to a packed University of Virginia auditorium, about what it was like to follow Barack Obama for eight years. WMRA’s Jordy Yager has more.

WMRA Daily 1/30/18

Jan 30, 2018

The Tebow Bill goes down in defeat again in the General Assembly… Virginia Republicans say they’re willing to talk Medicaid expansion, but only with work requirements for recipients… and, President Obama’s photographer remembers his days on the job in a talk at UVa….

WMRA Daily 1/29/18

Jan 29, 2018

Two deputies will not be charged for shooting a man to death last year in Culpeper County… the Atlantic Coast Pipeline clears two more regulatory hurdles in West Virginia and North Carolina… and, Governor Northam continues to push the Trump administration to exempt Virginia from offshore drilling….

WMRA Daily 1/26/18

Jan 26, 2018

You could call it another version of “Kill Bill.”  It was a busy week for the General Assembly, as bills promoting gun control, Medicaid expansion, marijuana legalization, and driver’s licenses for the undocumented all died in committees… But we get away from it all with a tour of Charlottesville’s French sister city, and the citadel of Besançon….

Marguerite Gallorini

Besançon has been Charlottesville’s sister city since 2006. In spite of their cultural differences, Charlottesville and Besançon are set in similar regions, and have similar vibes. There is one tourist attraction that doesn’t have its equal here though: Besançon’s 17th-century military citadel. Marguerite Gallorini was there over the holiday season and paints this picture for WMRA.

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